lone tree arts center

The Mastroiannis discover a place of welcome at the Lone Tree Arts Center

By Michelle Sosa-Mallory, Corporate and Foundation Manager

On their first visit to the Lone Tree Arts Center last May, the Mastroiannis were noticeably excited to see Broadway star Lea Salonga’s sold-out performance. Aleia walked quickly toward the Main Stage doors, while Eric hurried to keep up with her.

As the manager on duty, I was in the lobby to welcome the young couple and remember being delighted by their enthusiasm. After all, this is the kind of joy we hope all patrons experience when they get the chance to engage in the arts.

Eric, Aleia, and Lea

Eric and Aleia meet Broadway icon Lea Salonga at the Arts Center

“I had an opportunity to use these tickets through work, and asked Aleia if she wanted to go,” recalls Eric. He figured she would, with her rich background in the performing arts. Only, he hadn’t realized that as a ‘theater gal’ most of her life, Lea Salonga was one of Aleia’s artistic icons and inspirations. So, without hesitation, she responded ‘yes’ – of course she wanted to see the show!

Reflecting on the evening Aleia readily admits, “I was totally ‘fan girling’! Lea Salonga is the face of musical theater!” As the parents of three daughters—Lilliana (Lilly), 11; Sophia, 9; and Juliet, 7—a night together at the theater is a rare event, even with Aleia’s passion for the arts. She was professionally trained as a performer and taught theater to high school students when they lived in California.

“My love of the arts is one thing I want to share with the girls,” Aleia offers. “Unfortunately, it’s challenging for our family.” She explained that their youngest, Juliet, lives with autism, which affects her in many ways. For example, she can be sensitive to sounds and lighting effects. She is also prone to behaviors, such as vocalizing, which is typical for her condition, but not well understood, and often not well received, by audiences at a live performance.

Aleia shared that their oldest, Lilly, who is discovering a love of performance, recently had a part in her first school musical The Addams Family. They decided to attend as a family to support Lilly’s stage debut. But within a few minutes, Juliet felt distressed in this setting. She and Aleia had to leave the auditorium to avoid disruption, missing most of Lilly’s performance. According to Aleia, the experience reinforced their ‘fear factor’ about planning a future outing to the theater.

RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT TIME

Listening to their story, I immediately realized the moment of serendipity, and couldn’t help but smile broadly and announce, “Oh, you are definitely in the right place!” further explaining to Eric and Aleia that the Arts Center not only presents exceptional performers such as Lea Salonga, we lead the way in sensory friendly programming aimed at welcoming families in similar situations to the theater. That was probably not what they expected to hear, but seemed pleasantly surprised, and I hoped, reassured that other wonderful opportunities awaited their family at the Arts Center. With sensory friendly literature in hand, the couple settled into the theater for Lea’s show.

Two girls (Lilly and Sophia) stand on either side of

Lilly and Sophia meet special guest Popsicle

While every family’s story is unique, the Mastroiannis illustrate why they and many others in our community need and deserve the nurturing and judgement-free environment of our sensory friendly programming to experience the arts together. Our sensory friendly series is woven into our season, but more important, it is part of our place in making the arts inclusive for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

OPEN DOOR TO SENSORY FRIENDLY ARTS   

Like most busy families, the Mastroiannis constantly juggle and align their days. Eric explained that between school and many therapeutic needs, Juliet is scheduled seven days a week. In addition, Lilly and Sophia are involved in creating art, gymnastics, and working with media and technology.

Even with their full lives, they wanted to discover what the Arts Center could offer them as a family. As a starting point, they made room on their calendar to attend the Arts Center’s second annual Sensory Friendly Open House and Resource Fair on September 8 and hoped that Juliet would have a good time and feel welcomed and included. The free event gave them a chance to become familiar with the space, meet staff and volunteers, and explore the venue at an unhurried pace. From trying on costumes, to learning about props and staging, and testing out the lighting and sound technologies, the family made the most of the afternoon.

“What an awesome experience for our whole family!” Eric commented as they made their way around the interactive stations. The event seemed to be delivering on the promise.

However, the magic happened on the Main Stage, where a typically apprehensive Juliet let go of her worry of being in a new place. She danced and discovered a violin on a table set up as an instrument petting zoo to encourage musical exploration. Aleia braced for the instrument to get broken, but soon relaxed, as the charming Juliet revealed some of her own inner ‘theater gal.’

“All of a sudden, I heard the most beautiful voice coming from the stage,” remembers Lisa Rigsby Peterson, the Arts Center’s executive director, who was leading the Main Stage tour at the open house. “Then I noticed it was a mom singing to her daughter. It was Aleia!” In this moment, Aleia fulfilled her heartfelt wish to connect with Juliet through the arts.

Juliet is on stage in a blue dress with red flowers. She is facing the camera and has two fingers against her mouth. Her mother Aleia is kneeling on stage in a black sweater and white and grey striped skirt, with her back to the camera.

Aleia and Juliet, two ‘theater gals’

PAVING THE WAY FOR REMARKABLE EXPERIENCES

With growing confidence in our sensory friendly cultural experiences, the Mastroiannis are slowly getting to know the Arts Center. Later this month, we’ll welcome them to a sensory friendly performance of our annual tradition Home for the Holidays. Maybe this will be the start of a new tradition of celebrating the season while experiencing the arts as a family. Just a short time ago, Eric and Aleia didn’t think this was possible.

Through a wonderful twist of fate, we embrace the Mastroiannis as part of the Arts Center’s community. However, the Arts Center’s role in providing sensory friendly experiences is more than coincidence. Nearly seven years ago, we intentionally set out to create such a program that now paves the way for Juliet, her family, and many others to engage in the arts. The same mindful approach is true for our Community Impact programs that help us reach students, seniors, young children, and those experiencing early memory loss.

With your gifts of support to the Lone Tree Arts Center, these programs have flourished and enabled thousands to connect through accessible, inclusive, and affordable performing arts. Thank you for helping us make remarkable arts happen for everyone in our community!

Give today to the Arts Center: https://www.lonetreeartscenter.org/give

Preview: Classic Albums Live “Chronicle Vol. 1

headerBy Monica Jarrell, guest blogger

Did you enjoy listening to the songs of Creedence Clearwater Revival on your record player or on your 8 tracks when you were younger? The music of Creedence Clearwater Revival could be heard blaring out of car radios as they drove by or at roller rinks in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Classic Albums Live at the Lone Tree Arts Center is the only place where you can listen to the music of Creedence Clearwater performed with such accuracy, it’ll be as if you were in the recording studio when the original was recorded.

The Classic Albums Lives concert series was founded in 2003 in Toronto, Ontario by a musician named Craig Martin, who previously produced a series of boutique cabaret shows, including composing music for television and stage. Classic Albums live is a concert series in which musicians perform a classic rock album in its entirety and play each song in its perfection.

Creedence Clearwater Revival (often called CCR) was one of America’s greatest bands.  The music of CCR reached across generations with their mix of “blues” and “rock and roll. ” Remember “Down on the Corner,” “Bad Moon Rising,” and “Who’ll Stop the Rain”? You can hear these classics and much more when you come to see Classic Albums Live on Saturday, May 11, 2019 at the Lone Tree Arts Center.

Before CCR, John Fogerty, lead vocalist, lead guitarist and primary songwriter, joined his brother Tom Fogerty rhythm guitarist, Stu Cook, bass and drummer Doug Clifford in 1959 and formed the band The Blue Velvets. They were later called the Golliwogs. Their musical style encompassed roots rock, swamp rock, and blues rock. They played in a Southern rock style, despite their San Francisco Bay Area origin, with lyrics about bayous, catfish, the Mississippi River, and other popular elements of Southern United States.  They also wrote and sang political and socially conscious topics including the Vietnam War.

The band performed at the 1969 Woodstock Festival in Upstate New York.  CCR was inducted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993.  Creedence Clearwater Revival’s music is still a staple of US radio airplay; the band has sold 28 million records in the United States alone. Rolling Stone ranked them 82nd on its 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.

The talented musicians of Classic Albums Live will thrill audiences, young and old, playing all CCR’s greatest hits including “Have You Ever Seen the Rain?”. You will not want to miss the instantly-recognizable, toe tapping songs of one of the world’s greatest classic rock albums performed live on stage. You will be treated to an exact replication of the song’s as they were originally performed.

Purchase your tickets now, before they sell out!

Preview: Ranky Tanky

headerBy Theresa Allen, guest blogger

Get ready for a rich evening of storytelling though song when Ranky Tanky takes the main stage on Friday, April 26 at 8 p.m., at the Lone Tree Arts Center. Ranky Tanky brings the rich tradition of Gullah music of the Carolina coast and infuses it with its own spirited influences of jazz, funk, gospel and R&B. The evening will feature tender lullabies, playful game songs, and elegiac spirituals.

The members of Ranky Tanky include Quentin Baxter on drums and percussion. Baxter is a Grammy-nominated performer and producer of music. Quiana Parler brings her beautiful vocals to the group. Parler studied opera as a child and then gospel, pop and R&B. Clay Ross, founder of Ranky Tanky, performs vocals and guitar. Charlton Singleton, whose family comes from the Coast, plays on the trumpet and Kevin Hamilton performs on bass.

Gullah is a tradition of food, art, music and other cultural references that are deeply rooted in West African culture and have significantly influenced American culture. Gullah tradition has given us songs like “Kum Bah Ya” and “Michael Rowed the Boat Ashore” as well as influenced George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess and Zora Neale Hurston’s novel Their Eyes Were Watching God and children’s literature like Br’er Rabbit from Uncle Remus Songs and Sayings.

Join the Lone Tree Arts Center as it “gets funky!” (a loose translation of Ranky Tanky), on Friday, April 26. Tickets are on sale now from $25 to $45 and can be purchased at www.lonetreeartscenter.org. The Lone Tree Arts Center is located at 10075 Commons Street in Lone Tree. Free on-site parking is available.

Review: The Choir of Man

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By Cassie Schauer, guest blogger

Raise a pint to pub culture! We joined the cast for a fun night of dance and song when the Choir of Man hit the stage at the Lone Tree Arts Center on Thursday night, February 21, 2019.

With the stage set as an actual working pub (complete with Lone Tree Brewing Company beer on tap), we were invited to grab a pint as the cast members (all from the U.K.) mingled with the audience sharing selfies, and laughs. Blurring the line between stage and audience continued throughout the performance. It kicked off with the 80s hair-band hit “Welcome to the Jungle” which played surprisingly well with a folksy, Celtic twist. The cast dashed through the audience, on top of the bar, around the tables, playing all manner of instruments. Denis, the narrator, invited us “to be present for tonight: dance, sing, laugh, join in!”

We were drawn into the camaraderie between the men as Denis presented each one in funny vignettes of song and dance. An astoundingly multi-talented cast of Irish actors and singers, the performers played the piano, guitar, banjo, accordion, drums, ukulele, bagpipes, and fiddle. They pounded on trays and crates, and clapped beer mugs together. As Denis was weaving his tales, the energy of the pub was swirling around him. The boys were chatting, arguing, mopping the floor, talking on the phone, and spinning on the bar stools.

Playing the fiddle and banjo while singing Avicii’s “Wake Me Up,” they danced into the theater aisles, grabbing people from the audience to join them for a pint. Peter sang Katy Perry’s hit “Teenage Dream,” while staring longingly at his guest. As the song ended, she surprised him with a kiss on the cheek.

Andrew, “with the voice of Pavarotti, but dressed like an Agatha Christie character,” sang “The Impossible Dream” in a deep, rich tenor, while challenging his guest to build a card tower. The tower grew as the song crescendoed, and the rest of the crew joined in, topping the tower with a pint of beer and tossing cards at the audience.

“50 Ways to Leave Your Lover” showcased Freddie’s tap dancing skills and featured a piano solo by Connor. As Denis joked, “the more you drink the better we sound and the better we look” he decried the loss of local pubs to make way for chain restaurants and bars.

In a break from the action, Tom sang Adele’s hit “Hello.” Cleverly presented in freeze frame, the cast stood in suspended animation as if they were watching their team on TV. Mark shared his love for his wife while singing “Pina Coladas” into a mop handle. The crew joined in with exaggerated hip swinging, a cheesy flute solo, and disco lights.

We sang along to “500 Miles,” dubbed as “Scotland’s Most Famous Song.” An acapella version of Sia’s “Chandelier” was sung under prism lights as if reflected off the baubles of a chandelier.

One of the funniest scenes featured Aidan facing us in front of a bank of urinals, relieving himself as he sang “Under the Bridge” by the Red Hot Chili Peppers. The other cast members joined in as the never ending “flow” splashed onto the stage.

As the performance began to wind down, Denis raised a pint to his mum, stating “don’t treasure the moments only when they are gone.” This lead to the Luther Vandross hit, “Dance with My Father,” with the emotional “dear lord, she’s dying to dance with my father again” tugging at our heartstrings.

As a final statement to the brotherhood of pub life, Denis proclaimed, “when I come through those doors I feel at home.” They ended with the traditional Irish goodbye song, “The Parting Glass,” embracing us on their first North American Tour. A funny, energetic, and joyful celebration!

Preview: International Guitar Night

IGN new headerBy Michelle Marx, guest blogger

International Guitar Night brings to the stage four spectacular acoustic guitarists. Founded by Brian Gore in 1995, International Guitar Night has featured a diverse array of performers from around the world. This year is no exception. Gore has assembled four dynamic and accomplished guitarists.

From Italy, Luca Stricagnoli is a YouTube sensation with over 100 million views. His style is both innovative and unique and some might even call it crazy. He’s an enthusiastic showman and his performances have delighted audiences worldwide.

Cenk Erdogan is a fretless guitarist from Turkey. What is a fretless guitar? It’s a guitar with a fingerboard without frets which creates no interruption in the string and allows a greater range of sounds. Not only has Erdogan toured the world, he is also a leading fretless guitar educator.

Two guitarists hail from France. Swing guitarist Antoine Boyer was named Guitarist of the Year by Guitarist Magazine in 2012. He was the first gypsy jazz artist to win the honor. And the fourth artist for the evening is Flamenco guitarist Samuelito. Both a composer and performer, Samuelito loves to incorporate music of various origins.

International Guitar Night is known for rotating through only the best of the best in acoustic guitar, highlighting each individual artist and celebrating their skills through collaboration.

International Guitar Night is in town for only one night, Friday, February 15 at 8:00 pm at the Lone Tree Arts Center.

Click here for tickets, more information, and videos 

Review: Moscow Festival Ballet: Cinderella

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By Ashton Temby, guest blogger

Cinderella transformed out of her drab, pauper clothing into a beautifully garbed princess, with the help of her fairy Godmother, of course, at the Lone Tree Arts Center on Thursday night thanks to The Moscow Festival Ballet.

Though throughout the performance the dancers and technical specialists seemed to have had their glass slippers on the wrong feet at times, causing out of sync movements and abrupt endings to the pre-recorded music, the prince came to a masterful rescue in a true classic fairy tale manner.

Alexander Daev danced Prince Charming exquisitely with supreme confidence, grace, and unparalleled strength. He enchanted Cinderella and the audience alike with his precision, speed, and incredibly high leaps. “Oohs and ahhs” could be heard from the audience as he displayed perfect pirouettes and clean transitions while mastering the stage. The skills obtained from his time at Voronej Ballet School did not go unnoticed. It’s no wonder Cinderella fell into his arms and was swept away.

The Prince’s new found love was danced by Maria Sokolnikova in a smooth and innocent style expected in the role of Cinderella. Her persona accurately portrayed the humble and hardworking nature of the exploited sister, while also depicting the turmoil and sadness in the character’s life. Sokolnikova was perfectly in character throughout the life of the performance and reminded the audience that a true princess is beautiful on the inside first.

Sokolnikova is a gold medal winner in the competition of The Soul of Dance, among other impressive accomplishments. Her experience in ballet was apparent, but left one begging for more intricate movements. The choreography for Cinderella’s role was repetitive and appeared far less complex compared to the movements of her counterpart, Prince Charming, though her potential was obvious. More complicated dance from the main role would have brought further life and drama to this production.  It is hopeful she will be rewarded with roles in the future that push her outside her boundaries.

The classic folk tale, Cinderella, was created for the stage by Sergei Radchenko, and his wife, Elena Radchnko. Sergei Radchenko founded the Moscow Festival Ballet in 1989 after graduating from the Moscow School of Dance, and dancing for the Bolshoi Ballet for 25 years. His company has become world renowned as they continue to add to their breadth of work.

While this performance of Cinderella may not have been a pristine example of what audiences have come to expect from The Moscow Festival Ballet, it appeared accessible for audiences of all ages. The interpretation of the story was easily followed and provided a good platform for new and seasoned balletomanes.

Cinderella was a one time show at the Lone Tree Arts Center, but it is hopeful that the company returns with impeccably executed productions in the future.

Review: Matt Dusk

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By Janice Hubbell, guest blogger

On a snowy and brutally cold Saturday evening, my hubby and I arrived at the Lone Tree Art Center (thankfully only a couple blocks away) to see Toronto jazz crooner, Matt Dusk, perform. We expected to see unclaimed seats in the sold-out show but were pleasantly surprised to see an audience full of brave music lovers! Matt’s appearance and voice were as dreamy as one might expect at a pop concert, although much more enjoyable! We enjoyed each rendition of jazz standards from the Great American Songbook as Matt warmed up the audience and proceeded to charm us out of our seats! (Naturally, since Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, the songs were romantically inclined such as “My Funny Valentine.” I noticed couples in the audience holding hands and gazing in each other’s eyes…) We also enjoyed the glass of champagne and cookies during intermission—what a lovely surprise!

More than just a professional performer, Matt’s stage presence was warm and genuinely friendly as he invited the audience into his life, sharing bits and pieces of his personal career and family. I especially enjoyed his stories before several of his songs—who doesn’t enjoy a good story?! For instance, I had no idea Johnny Mercer wrote “One For My Baby (And One For The Road)” on a napkin in a bar, in the middle of nowhere, on a road trip to propose to Judy Garland…and he literally was singin’ the blues after discovering she had just married! As much as I like a good cover, I love original music even more so, and Matt performed one of his signature heartbreak stories beautifully. The best song of the night, hands down, however was “Two Shots of Happy, One Shot of Bad,” written for Frank Sinatra by U2 stars, Bono and The Edge. Sadly, Frank died before performing, and Bono allowed Matt Dusk to debut this song depicting real life. Matt really captured our hearts in his sensitive portrayal as no one moved or made a sound. The concert ended with his moving tribute to Frankie—“I Did It My Way!”

Matt Dusk’s trio of musicians were on the same level as his vocal performance—just a piano, acoustic bass, and saxophone player. Their accompaniment showcased his voice perfectly but he also allowed them to shine individually. As we were leaving, we encountered Matt in the hallway and he stopped to shake hands and chat. We complimented his performance and mentioned the musicality of his band, especially since there was no drummer. As a musician, I know how difficult that is—musicians lean on the drummer to carry the song and must be twice as good to carry the music without percussion. Matt mentioned they were all from Denver and that he would pass on the compliment!

 

 

 

Review: PostSecret: The Show

by Kristi Andrus, guest blogger

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All of the stories featured in PostSecret: The Show were true. I didn’t expect that. I guess I understood the concept, but still thought the production would have embellished or taken creative license or something. Huh, I guess that truth is stranger than fiction.

Some of the secrets and stories were funny, some were poignant, some were disgusting, some were heartbreaking, some were ironic, and some were heartwarming. The ones that moved me were people so touched by other people’s secrets that they responded to offer camaraderie, support, even money. The stories of people saving voicemails of their loved ones to listen to after they died were relatable and hard to hear. The postcard I’m not sure I’ll ever forget said: “Everyone who knew me before 9/11 believes I’m dead.”

Why?! Why would he/she do that to people that love them? To people that know them and cared about them and now mourn them? Was it so bad? Is he/she escaping something? It’s got to be made into a book, right? Someone please take that secret and run with it. Write the book, option the rights to a movie, who knows where it could go?

The best parts:

The actors – There were only three, Maria Glanz, TJ Dawe, and Kerry Ipema. They were fantastic and believable. It was so much fun to see them embody the different people from the postcards.

The start – “Listen. Don’t Judge. Use a voice of compassion. Build rapport.” Relevant and riveting from the get-go. It could have been a mantra.

The stats – I pee in the shower is the most common secret mailed in. Tell me who feels the need to confess that? I wish I had someone to share my secrets with is the second most common secret. That’s sad. Vulnerability is powerful y’all. Share with a friend and watch your relationship evolve. You don’t have to share your biggest, worst, darkest secret, maybe start small and see how it goes.

The timing – “In 2004, nothing went viral.” Timing, ladies and gentleman, is everything, and ideas, businesses, and relationships are made and broken on that alone. This concept probably wouldn’t work in today’s world, but it worked when it launched and it’s still going strong. Check out the blog to see how it’s expanded.

The instructions – Take a postcard, or two. Tell your secret anonymously. Stamp and mail the postcard. Your secret can be a regret, fear, betrayal, desire, confession, or childhood humiliation. Reveal anything – as long as it is true and you have never shared it with anyone before. Simple and powerful.

If you missed the show, I’m sorry, it was a great night out. To the fellow audience members with really great laughs, thank you for being a delightful soundtrack to the show.

See you at Lone Tree Arts Center for the next one!

Review: PostSecret: The Show

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By Joy Carletti, guest blogger

I have a secret.

I’ve been an off-again, on-again reader of PostSecret for over a decade and a writer and storyteller for nearly as long – and my biggest concern about PostSecret: The Show was that it wouldn’t have enough story to it. After all, it’s based on lots of random anonymous lines written on postcards. How much narrative could there be? Where would the emotional arc come from? How satisfied would I be when walking away from this show?

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PostSecret: The Show was an immersive experience from the very start. Before the show on February 8, sticky notes bearing secrets hung on mirrors in the restrooms, paired with pens and blank pads encouraging hand washers to add their own. (My husband let me know that the men’s room had a number of secrets that read “I don’t wash my hands.”  I didn’t see any such secrets in the ladies’ room, but there were a lot of secrets about husbands.) In the theater, a large screen beckoned audience members to tweet their secrets with a specific hashtag in order to be put onscreen. A lot of “check-ins” were shared on the screen but few true secrets. To be fair, Twitter does not promise the anonymity that an unsigned postcard or sticky note does.

The show started by dramatizing PostSecret founder Frank Warren’s most memorable call while volunteering on a suicide hotline. This was done through voiceover and simple movement; it was both dramatic and moving. The story’s ending was not revealed, but the scene had an energy and a gravitas that were leading. Why might any call into a suicide hotline be memorable?

There is a quote from Oliver Twist that I’ve long treasured, “It is the custom on the stage… to present the tragic and the comic scenes, in as regular alternation, as the layers of red and white in a side of streaky bacon.” PostSecret does this beautifully, segueing from its powerful opening into a series of projected postcards about peeing in the shower. This carried throughout the night: moments of extreme tension were followed by great levity. Each postcard on the screen found murmured relatability in the audience. The secrets came in thematic waves, with some broken out and developed into story-scenes by three actors (TJ Dawe, Maria Glanz, Kerry Ipema). Some of these worked very well, showing how people were affected by secrets shared. Others felt a bit treacly and over the top, occasionally giving the sense that PostSecret was the catalyst for healing – rather than the humans behind the stories.

The show incorporated interaction throughout. Following intermission, the audience’s own secrets were read onstage by the actors. These got the biggest responses of the night: raucous laughter, shouts of encouragement, ripples of sympathy. After the show, a photographer was available to take pictures of audience members with their secrets on a whiteboard. The line to share was long!

In the end, my own fears proved unfounded. Of course, wonderful stories emerged out of mere secrets on postcards. Once a secret is shared, there’s an urge to keep sharing. The emotional arc of PostSecret:The Show builds that urge into a wave. I walked out of the show ready to dig into my inner self for something I hadn’t shared before, if only to be part of the movement. It was a truly satisfying evening of theatre – and made for great ride-home conversation!

Preview: Moscow Festival Ballet’s Cinderella

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Photo by Alexander Daev

By Ashton Temby, guest blogger

The Moscow Festival Ballet brings the classic folk tale Cinderella to the Lone Tree Arts Center’s main stage for one night only on Thursday, February 15, 2018.

Cinderella weaves the tale of an unfortunate young woman suddenly at the mercy of her evil stepmother and stepsisters. With the help of her fairy godmother, Cinderella transforms and gets to attend a royal ball wherein she meets her prince.

This interpretation of the classic story was shaped by Sergei Radchenko and his wife, Elena Radchenko.

Sergei Radchenko founded The Moscow Festival Ballet in 1989, creating the first independent company of classic ballet. As a graduate of the Moscow School of Dance, and a dancer for 25 years with the Bolshoi Ballet, Radchenko possessed the framework to found this, now, world renowned company.

Since 1989, The Moscow Festival Ballet has toured, Japan, Korea, Singapore, China, Canada, the United States, and many European countries creating its respected reputation for performing classical elements of Russian ballet.

While Spanish dance is known to be Radchenko’s favorite, he and the company continue to add to their breadth of work, and now also specialize in Twentieth Century ballets, such as Cinderella.

“To stimulate modern viewer interest and need for the art of Russian classical ballet is a main task of our team.” – Elena and Sergei Radchenko (radchenko-ballet.com).

Classical dance elements with a modern twist make this one night performance the event of the season. Tickets can be purchased here or at through the box office.